About the Minor

Perfect for students interested in careers in public service, public policy, government, non-profits and advocacy, social activism, and community education, the Intercollege Minor in Civic and Community Engagement empowers students to use classroom learning with and for communities.

Through engaging in collaborative practice, students transfer their education beyond their classrooms by integrating democratic principles, public issues, and questions of civic purpose with their academic and professional development.

Through a balanced program of fieldwork and supporting coursework culminating in a capstone project, students complete the CIVCM minor having creatively and positively affected public practices through processes of collaborative, community-based learning. Only one specific course, Foundations of Civic and Community Engagement (CIVCM 211, cross-listed with different courses at different campuses), is required for the CIVCM minor.

Why a minor in Civic and Community Engagement?

Group of students sitting in front of the Center for Ethical Living and Social Justice Renewal in New Orleans, Louisiana

Group of students volunteer at the Center for Ethical Living and Social Justice Renewal in New Orleans, Louisiana

The Civic and Community Engagement minor provides an opportunity for students to extend their education beyond the classroom through engagement in socially meaningful public scholarship in both pre-existing and newly developing community projects.

This minor entails situated as well as experiential learning.  Students apply, test, analyze and re-formulate academic material in the context of public issues and community settings.  Engaging in “learning-by-doing” allows students to communicate across differences, fulfill civic responsibilities, gain insight into personal values and world-views, develop civic skills including observation and listening, and further develop career interests and professional goals.

The Civic and Community Engagement Minor offers students agency to bridge classroom learning with actually existing public problems, thus helping to fulfill the Land Grant mission for both student-citizens and communities across the Commonwealth, the United States, and beyond.